U.S. Department of Homeland Security - United States Coast Guard Auxiliary
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About The Auxiliary

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary Agency Group GraphicAgency Overview

Established by Congress in 1939 under title 14, §§ 23 of the U.S. Code, the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary is Semper Paratus(Always Ready). We invite you to explore our site and learn more about who we are and what we do to be "Semper Paratus."

The Auxiliary operates in

In addition to the above, the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary operates in any mission as directed by the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard or Secretary of Homeland Security.

Our Mission

The over arching mission of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary is to contribute to the safety and security of our citizens, ports, and waterways. We balance our missions of Recreational Boating Safety and Coast Guard Support with Maritime Homeland Security and other challenges that emerge as a result of a post-9/11 era.

Organization

The Auxiliary has units in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, and Guam.

Under the direct authority of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security via the Commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, the Auxiliary's internally operating levels are broken down into four organizational levels: Flotilla, Division, District and National.

U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary District Map

Auxiliary History

When the Coast Guard "Reserve" was authorized by act of Congress on June 23,1939, the Coast Guard was given a legislative mandate to use civilian to promote safety on and over the high seas and the nation's navigable waters.

Two years later, on Feb. 19, Congress amended the 1939 act with passage of the Auxiliary and Reserve Act of 1941. Passage of this act designated the Reserve as a military branch of the active service, while the civilian section, formerly referred to as the Coast Guard Reserve, became the Auxiliary under title 14, chapter 23 of the USC.

When we entered World War II, 50,000 Auxiliary members joined the war effort as military teams. Many of their private vessels were placed into service in an effort to protect the U.S.

Page Last Reviewed or Updated: December 12, 2013